Do You Need It “Fixed” or Do You Want It “Changed”?

Are you at that inflection point that you need to break out of your current business doldrums? Then our challenge to you is:

Are you ready to accomplish real change, or do you simply want to keep fixing things?

Let’s say you have a leak in your kitchen sink and you want it fixed quickly because it could be causing damage. What if, on the other hand, you wanted to improve its usability and functionality, you chose to completely remodel your kitchen?

Fixing the sink merely puts things back where they were so you can continue doing what you’ve always done.

Remodeling your kitchen improves the comfort of your house, its value, and your enjoyment of it.

That’s the big difference between fixing and changing.

The first issue requires a qualified individual, like a plumber. A plumber is going to come out with his trusty tools, spend a couple of hours fixing the problem using his “best trade practices” and then hand you a bill. Voila, you’ve got a fixed sink. Everything’s back to the way it was. Quick and relatively pain free.

Remodeling the kitchen, though, is a whole different ball game. It will not be done with one phone call. Again, you start with a specialist, like an architect or designer, to determine what you want to achieve. They help define the look, the work flow, the appliances, colors, textures, the lighting.  And, oh, what’s the new sink like? Then, after all that planning, your next call is to another specialist, like a general contractor, who brings in all of the trades (and all of their tools) and transforms your tired old kitchen into a completely new and exciting environment, ready to meet your dreams for the future. That transformation took a team.

So, when we ask you: do you want it fixed or changed – we are pushing you on this significant issue.

Do you want just the quick fix, then carry on as you always have? Or are you ready to change your company into what you’ve been dreaming about?

Do you want a business fixer? Or do you want a whole team that’s going to take your company blazing into the future with change?

It’s going to take some changes. You ready?

Dave

Singles or Home Runs?

We’re coming up on Major League Baseball Opening Day. Spring time in America! You just can’t beat it!

There’s probably nothing more exciting in all of sports than to see a grand slam home run. The bases are loaded and the batter knocks it into the second level of the left field bleachers. There’s just something about that event that makes the rest of the game almost fade away. You’ll remember that play probably long after you’ve even forgotten the final score of the game.

So what?

Way back in an earlier life, I had the privilege and challenge of working with a company as the vice president and general manager of their computer distribution division. This was early in the computer business and all of us in the market were pushing and shoving and trying to differentiate ourselves. I was fortunate enough to work with a well-funded parent company, so we had the wherewithal to do some creative things–so, we did. Of course, we  were also competing many times with equally well-funded companies and that meant they were doing some of their own creative campaigns.

After trying several different programs, succeeding at some and failing at others, the president of the company challenged me with a baseball analogy (lesson?) that I’ve been applying ever since.

After a particularly costly marketing plan that did not achieve much, he said: “Dave, you’re really good at swinging for the fences with some of your campaigns, but I’d be much more pleased if you’d just give me consistent singles and doubles.”

He went on to say: “If you do that, we’ll make consistent progress and get more growth while the other guys waste their time and effort on their home run attempts.”

It’s a lesson I’ve never forgotten, even though it’s still in me to want to swing for the outfield bleachers.

As we work with clients, we challenge them to define their ideal client and that then leads to developing a more defined “go-to-market” strategy to best reach those ideal clients. While we’re not marketing experts, we are “go-to-market” experts. Meaning, that we take the “singles and doubles” approach to getting new business and keeping it. No fancy “home run” efforts. Just good old fashioned approach to improving batting averages by doing the right things consistently and repeatedly. This has proven over and over again to result in healthy growth without major investment in unproven marketing or sales efforts. Just the basics of getting a hit most of the time you step in the batter’s box. Which, by the way, happens every day.

So, when you go into work tomorrow, hit consistent singles and doubles. Forget expecting your team to hit home runs. Make sure everyone is doing the basics.

  • Call your prospects
  • Return phone calls
  • Be honest
  • Be consistent
  • Be dependable
  • Be reliable
  • Be responsible

Be the best batter – that’s the one who consistently gets a hit – not the one who occasionally hits a home run. That will grow your reputation and your business more than any other strategy.

Be blessed out there!

Dave

Are You Making Plans for Next Year?

We’re talking here about your annual business planning session. The annual “how are we doing, where have we been and where are we going from here” meeting. However, if you’re looking to do the more significant strategic planning meeting, your list is going to be significantly different and will incorporate far different elements.

Here’s a brief checklist of the basic things to get done to make the most of your planning:

  1. Establish the objectives and purpose of your planning session. Include plans for all of the major business areas in your company:
    • Sales
    • Marketing
    • HR and personnel
    • Finances
    • Operations (systems and processes)
  1. Gather all the data needed to evaluate each of the above. Delegate this to the department heads when and where possible. It is important that your leadership team participate in this exercise. They (and you) will need the last 3 to 5 years of data and any comparative year to date info that has been tracked for the current year.
  2. Formulate the guidelines of the exercise to challenge your team and let them know what they are working toward.
  3. Set expectations for the new year. This will be the time to tell your team and get them all going in the direction you want. Ten percent growth year over year? Five new major clients?Five percent EBITDA growth?  You get the idea. You’re the leader.  You are the only one with a blank page. Everyone else will be working from your outline.
  4. Draft an agenda and determine how much time this planning time is going to take. One day? Two days? Delegate the planning of the program including location, food and other details.
  5. Schedule the meeting.  Put it on the calendar as soon as possible so everyone has ample time to clear everything else off their calendar. This should be a “no miss” meeting.

One final, but important, note: invite as many people as possible to participate and contribute to this, even if they are not going to be in the actual meeting. You want engagement and the best way to get it is to engage them first. If you’re a business of “one” you can still engage your closest adviser or mentor.

Good luck with your planning. If you need help in this early stage, the actual planning session or in the execution of the plan, I’m here for you. Call or text me. I’d be honored to help. Your success is my success.

Dave